The Legacy of Women in WWI

Kate Adie a famous war correspondent mentions Bridport in her book Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One. (Kate resides in Bridport)

fighting-on-the-home-front-by-kate-adieBridport in Dorset, centre of rope-making since the 13th century. Much of the work was carried out by women and children in their cottages. Now, incredible numbers of nets and ropes were suddenly needed for the army — lanyards, pull-through cords for rifles, hay nets for horses. The women of Bridport, though grossly underpaid for their huge labour, were recognised by the government as essential war workers and exempted from recruitment into the Land Army. They were joined by Belgian refugees, dispersed from London. When hemp ran low — German submarines disrupted supplies — the hay nets (the War Office asked for a million of them) were made out of Manila twine, which unfortunately the war horses found delicious.

Buy Kate Adie’s book: Fighting on the Home Front: The Legacy of Women in World War One